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Your Trusted Source for Commercial and Residential Locksmiths in Mountain Park

Finding a certified, experienced locksmith is no easy task. Sure, dozens of companies out there will dispatch an indifferent “technician” that offers “quick” solutions when you lose your keys. But when it comes to protecting your home and your business, cheap locks and part-time contractors just won’t cut it. Arrowhead Lock & Safe stands out as the most trusted name in security solutions and products in Georgia in an industry known for poor service and mediocre locksmiths.

Established in 1973, Arrowhead Lock & Safe is a locally owned locksmith and control access firm. Having protected homeowners and business professionals in metro Mountain Park for decades, we have built our reputation on exemplary service and the highest quality security products available. Unlike other locksmith companies, we carry all of the major brands that you know and trust to protect your family and your business, including:

  • Medeco
  • Arrow
  • Schlage
  • Keymark
  • Kwikset
  • Mul-T-Lock,
  • Sargent
  • Baldwin
Your Trusted Source for Commercial and Residential Locksmiths in Mountain Park

As a comprehensive locksmith repair center and dealer, we also own an on-site lock shop to serve our clients better. That way, we can assist with your day-to-day needs like re-keying, cutting keys, and repairing locks. So whether you’re looking for a brand-new security platform for your business or simply need a new set of keys for your storage unit, we are here to help. Our goal is to exceed your expectations with every service we offer.

Here are just a few reasons why customers choose Arrowhead Lock & Safe:

  • Our residential and commercial locksmiths in Mountain Park are bonded, licensed, insured, and ready to work hard.
  • Every professional locksmith is vetted via interviews and background checks.
  • We offer a wide range of locksmith services, from simple fixes to multi-step security system installations.
  • We carry a huge stock of premium, name-brand security hardware.
  • Our prices are affordable, and our quotes are 100% free of charge.
  • We aim to go the extra mile for ALL of our customers. It’s just the way we do business!
Here are just a few reasons why customers choose Arrowhead Lock & Safe
Residential Locksmith Services: Keeping Your Home and Family Safe

Residential Locksmith Services: Keeping Your Home and Family Safe

Though home appraisers may disagree, the value of your home isn’t defined by the four walls and roofs that cover a property. The real value of your home lies within those walls where your family eats, sleeps, and plays. When it comes to the safety of your family and the security of your valuables, having quality locks installed on your home is paramount. When your home has lackluster locks and minimal protection, the things that you hold closest to your heart are at risk.

That is why having a dependable residential locksmith in Mountain Park is so important – to ensure that your home is protected and that your family is safe from intruders. When you have problems with the locks on your home, you need a solution quickly. When you call Arrowhead Lock & Safe, know that our locksmiths will work efficiently and tirelessly until your home is secure. Whether your home’s locks need to be repaired or you need to consult with us about an integrated security system, our skilled locksmiths are available when you need them the most.

We offer a variety of residential locksmith services to preserve your peace of mind seven days a week, 365 days a year:

Re-Keying Services

Re-Keying Services

Does your home have a complicated lock setup that requires you to use different keys for different doors? Perhaps a former babysitter still has a key to your home. Whatever your reasons, our team of seasoned locksmiths will come to your home, re-key your locks in an efficient manner, and leave you feeling more secure in your house.

New Lock Installation

New Lock Installation

Your home is only as safe as the locks that you have on your doors. As your locks age or when you are the victim of a security threat, you may feel that it’s time to install new locks on the doors of your home. This can be long, laborious, and complicated for the average homeowner. For that reason, many clients trust Arrowhead Lock & Safe to handle the hard work for them. When you arrange for new lock installation, one of our experienced residential locksmiths will come to your home and install new locks on your doors. Once we’re done, we’ll make sure your family has enough keys to open your new locks.

High-Security Lock Installation

High-Security Lock Installation

If you are a homeowner who has experienced a break-in or want to take additional steps to secure your assets, high-security locks are a great solution. We offer a wide variety of locks from a plethora of major brands. We are fully equipped to meet your needs, whether you’re interested in more traditional lock systems with high key differs or pry resistant lock technology.

Access Control System Installation

Access Control System Installation

If you feel like you need an extra layer security and want to make sure that only certain individuals have access to your home, an access control system is a great solution to your problem. Whether you are interested in electronic or magnetic locks or have been looking to install a password-protected system, our team of experts can help. Contact our office today for a free consultation to learn more about your access control system options in Georgia.

Commercial Locksmith Services: Protecting Your Customers and Your Business

If you are a business owner in Georgia, you have the weighty responsibility of protecting your patrons and securing your businesses’ assets. The most common way for entrepreneurs to keep their business safe is by having a commercial locksmith in Mountain Park install quality, reliable locks on every entry point of your storefront. But, unfortunately, many business owners take the least amount of effort necessary when it comes to protecting their business.

Whether you own several franchise locations or have a single storefront, it only takes one break-in to make you realize the importance of installing high-quality locks for your commercial property. Sadly, at that point, it’s too late – your ability to provide for your family and pay your bills has been compromised. For that reason alone, it’s always better to be proactive about your businesses’ security rather than reactive.

At Arrowhead Lock & Safe, our commercial door lock services are designed to ensure that your assets and your customers are protecting 24-hours a day, seven days a week. We will always take the time to walk you through your options, explaining the pros and cons of each security solution so that you can make an informed decision. With a wide range of security offerings and a reliable team of commercial locksmith experts on your side, choosing the right security setup is easy, efficient, and affordable.

Commercial Locksmith Services: Protecting Your Customers and Your Business

Here are just a few of the commercial services we offer, all set up and installed by a certified, highly-trained commercial locksmith in Mountain Park:

Commercial Door Locks

Commercial Door Locks

Installing high-quality door locks for your business is one of the best ways to protect your assets and your commercial property. At Arrowhead Lock & Safe, we offer many commercial door lock options from the best brands in our industry. From reliable maintenance service on your current Grade 3 locks to new Grade 1 commercial door lock installation, our team of commercial locksmiths is ready to help.

Commercial Door Lock Repair

Commercial Door Lock Repair

If your businesses’ locks are old and need proper maintenance or corrective repair services, it’s always best to work with a team of experts. From re-keying services to fixing stuck or broken locks, our commercial locksmiths are only a phone call away.

Alarm Systems

Alarm Systems

Commercial alarms for businesses are more complex than their residential relatives, and for a good reason. Our cutting-edge alarm systems are great for preventing and interrupting break-ins, notifying the authorities, and act as an important addition to any business that wants enhanced security.

Security Cameras

Security Cameras

A commercial-grade CCTV system installed by Arrowhead Lock & Safe allows you to monitor all activities that take place under your businesses’ roof. Having security cameras installed around your business gives you added peace of mind and evidence for the police if a break-in occurs. Having visible security cameras can also help deter criminals and prevent suspicious activity from ever taking place. With remote monitoring capability on your smart device, you can check in on your storefront any time of the night or day, from just about any location.

Access Control Systems

Access Control Systems

Having the ability to control every one of your businesses’ locks is a proactive, cost-efficient way to protect your customers and your assets. With a commercial-grade control access system from Arrowhead Lock & Safe, business owners can easily restrict certain areas within their store, prevent physical key duplication, record entry history, and even simplify employee turnover.

ANSI Door Lock Grades Explained

ANSI Door Lock Grades Explained

The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) grading system was developed years ago to standardize a testing procedure to measure the durability and strength of a door lock. This grading system applies to both residential and commercial door locks. Composed of three different grades, the ANSI grading system gives homeowners and business owners a good idea of lock quality and reliability. ANSI examines six different qualities to determine a lock’s grade:

  • Strength Cycles – How many uses a lock can withstand before a replacement lock is needed)
  • Operational – This refers to a door’s ability to latch when it is closed
  • Security – The effectiveness of the lock’s security
  • Material – What kind of material is the lock made of?
  • Finish – Satin, nickel-plated, bronze, etc.

Grade 1 Locks

These locks offer the highest level of security and are most often used by institutions like hospitals, schools, and even museums. These locks also have the highest life expectancy, though they can be much more complex and require an expert residential or commercial locksmith in cityname to install. In today’s day and age, many more homeowners are opting for Grade 1 locks (like electronic locks) for the most peace of mind. This classification of lock must hold up against 800,000 cycles, six door strikes and a 360-pound weight test.

Grade 2 Locks

These locks are great for residential areas with more foot traffic, like a door that leads to an apartment complex or suite of rooms. These locks can also suffice for small businesses that need a higher level of security than Grade 3 locks. Use these locks when you want to secure access to areas with valuable equipment or sensitive documents. This classification of lock requires 400,000 cycles, four door strikes, and a 250-pound weight test.

Grade 3 Locks

This grade of lock is best suited for residential purposes and is considered standard door hardware. This kind of lock is the least expensive and should never be used in a high-traffic area like a lobby or storefront. However, these locks would be suitable for areas without much foot traffic like storage closets or areas without expensive merchandise. Because these locks are easiest to bypass, consider upgrading your Grade 3 locks with anti-bump and anti-pick technology. This classification of lock requires 200,000 lock cycles, two door strikes, and a 150-pound weight test.

Protect Your Home or Business Today

A famous animator and movie director once said: “The way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing.” This quote rings especially true when it comes to protecting your home or business with the best security solutions in Georgia. If you’re worried about the safety of your family or the wealth that you have worked so hard to create, contact our office today at 404-351-4331 for a free consultation. When you trust Arrowhead Lock & Safe, you can rest easy knowing your most precious belongings are safe and secure.

Contact us!

Latest News in Mountain Park

Lilburn-Mountain Park-Area Unemployment Rate Steady: Latest Data

The Gwinnett County unemployment rate stayed the same during the late summer.LILBURN-MOUNTAIN PARK, GA — The U.S. posted its weakest job recovery month of the year in September, with just 194,000 non-farm jobs added to the economy.The September jobs report was even worse than that in August, when 366,000 jobs were created, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.The national unemployment rate dropped 0.4 percentage points to 4.8 percent despite the September disappointment.The latest available loc...

The Gwinnett County unemployment rate stayed the same during the late summer.

LILBURN-MOUNTAIN PARK, GA — The U.S. posted its weakest job recovery month of the year in September, with just 194,000 non-farm jobs added to the economy.

The September jobs report was even worse than that in August, when 366,000 jobs were created, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The national unemployment rate dropped 0.4 percentage points to 4.8 percent despite the September disappointment.

The latest available local unemployment figures are for August; that rate stayed the same as July for the Lilburn-Mountain Park area and is still lower than it was during the worst of the pandemic, the BLS said.

The Gwinnett County unemployment rate was 2.8 percent in August, unchanged from July. That reflected some improvement from August 2020, when the unemployment rate stood at 6.8 percent.

The August unemployment rate in Gwinnett County was lower than the Georgia rate of 3.1 percent, according to the latest local figures from the BLS.

Nationally, 17.4 million jobs have been added back to the economy since April 2020. Still, the country is down 5 million positions (3.3 percent) from pre-pandemic levels.

The jobs report was likely affected negatively by multiple crises, according to The Washington Post. Parts of the country were reeling from Hurricane Ida's devastating damage. Wildfires in California have also caused business disruption. Coronavirus cases were also much higher in early to mid-September than they are now.

Average hourly wages continued to climb in September, with a 17-cent gain to $30.85. Hourly wages have grown for six months in a row as employers look to fill vacant positions.

Employees have been more willing than ever to leave their employers. A record 4.3 million employees quit their jobs in August, according to the BLS.

The leisure/hospitality and professional/business service industries led the way for September job gains with 74,000 and 60,000 jobs, respectively. Retail trade jobs increased by 56,000 jobs after two months of little change.

Editor's note: This post was automatically generated using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) program. Please report any errors or other feedback to content@patch.com.

Trouble in paradise: Fulton’s smallest city mulls dissolving

It sounds unbelievable: Tucked into a valley just a mile from Ga. 92 sits a city of 583 people who live within walking distance of two lakes and no commercial properties.It is a state-designated wildlife refuge in North Fulton where you park by the wooden rocking chairs outside City Hall, and not five minutes later can bump into the Mayor Pro-Tem walking his dog named Mosby.The city’s biggest problem used to be beavers gnawing down too many trees by the lakes (they hired a professional trapper to solve that one).Bu...

It sounds unbelievable: Tucked into a valley just a mile from Ga. 92 sits a city of 583 people who live within walking distance of two lakes and no commercial properties.

It is a state-designated wildlife refuge in North Fulton where you park by the wooden rocking chairs outside City Hall, and not five minutes later can bump into the Mayor Pro-Tem walking his dog named Mosby.

The city’s biggest problem used to be beavers gnawing down too many trees by the lakes (they hired a professional trapper to solve that one).

But today, there’s new trouble in paradise.

Some in the city of Mountain Park are curious about how to dissolve the city’s charter — in essence, an anti-cityhood movement a few years short of its centennial.

When asked about Mountain Park’s prospects, House Speaker Pro-Tempore Jan Jones said: “I think long-term it will be difficult for them to remain an incorporated city.”

Mayor Jim Still said it’s not uncommon for people to get frustrated and talk about disbanding the city. It happened as recently as 2010, when folks were worried that litigation over the two lakes would bankrupt city coffers.

What’s different now, Still said, is that familiar irritation has turned into actual exploration.

Mosby’s owner and Mayor Pro-Tempore Mark Murphy wants to study the consequences of dissolution. This comes after a fight over public safety and how to pay for it with a tax base that includes zero commercial properties.

The nearby city of Roswell has provided policing along with emergency services to the small burg since 1998.

Roswell earlier this year increased its bill for services by 484%, so Mountain Park residents would pay the same as actual Roswell taxpayers.

At one point, Roswell council members were afraid Mountain Park would respond by forcibly annexing itself into the larger city. That move would have saddled Roswell’s taxpayers with possibly tens of millions of dollars in debt and infrastructure costs.

The two cities went back and forth for months — until this week, when it was agreed that Roswell would provide fire and 911 services. The smaller city is still negotiating with the Fulton County Sheriff’s Office to provide policing.

But the existential crisis for Mountain Park residents continues: Is this city viable? Are residents OK with the level of services? Is paradise worth all this trouble?

“We’ve been able to adapt for many years to the ever-changing circumstances,” Still said.

A DIY spirit

Mountain Park has never been normal.

When the city was formed in 1927, it became the only locality in Georgia to receive a charter without a legal resident.

Sculpted from about 250 acres of woods, Mountain Park became a spot for rich folks to beat the heat lakeside on the weekends.

There was no running water — residents shared a community well. Used to be, the only news that that came out of Mountain Park was people on the shore laughing at a man who lost his bathing suit while water skiing.

Twenty years after incorporation, there were maybe 12 year-round residents and 241 registered voters. Nearly three-quarters of those voters were actually from Atlanta, with the rest from all over: Chicago, Florida, New York, Pennsylvania or Tennessee.

Anyone with 50-foot frontage in Mountain Park used to be able to vote until a Supreme Court decision around 1960 determined that voters must actually reside in the city.

And the city has always had a DIY spirit.

In 1952, about 15 members of the Lorelie Ladies’ Club of Atlanta decided to build a cement block cabin. “No husbands were brought into this endeavor,” one club member told The Atlanta Constitution.

Politics in “The Park” have long been along the fault line of old-timers versus newcomers. Residents started predicting that all the growth in metro Atlanta would spell doom for their quiet wooded hamlet 35 years ago.

The current conversation of folding into Roswell is reminiscent of the brief idea from 1989 of consolidating the county’s northern area into the city North Fulton. This talk came out of the eventually successful Sandy Springs cityhood movement.

The quest for cityhood is usually mostly driven by residents wanting better services.

Roswell Mayor Lori Henry said Still approached her soon after she was elected and said Mountain Park was thinking about getting rid of its volunteer fire department, so he was curious if Roswell wanted to buy their gear and station.

She looked into the current arrangement and found that Mountain Park residents were paying less for Roswell services than actual Roswell taxpayers. So she asked for an amount based on the number of residents in the small city as opposed to the previous rate.

That change in the math meant Mountain Park would pay $374 per resident or more than $200,000 annually — a salty increase from its previous $64 per resident.

Mountain Park’s entire budget bobs around half a million dollars. That’s small enough to do their budgeting in QuickBooks.

“I don’t think they were even anticipating what the cost of public service actually is,” Henry said.

‘Survival mode’

All this annexation and taxation talk has animated eleven people to run for the three of the open at-large council seats.

One of the current candidates is Bill Kolbrener. He said the 8.0 millage rate the city council approved Wednesday was “a bone with no meat and very little marrow” to appease him and others who wanted an even lower rate.

Kolbrener has spent $150 on signs for his roadside home that advocate for responsible government spending.

“Until we know what we’re going to be as a city … let’s go in survival mode,” he told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

The St. Louis native moved from Roswell to Mountain Park three years ago because “it’s truly heaven in the middle of an urban sprawl.” But he’s interested in whether they can keep it that way while reducing taxes.

Councilwoman Linda Dorough Dixon said keeping the charter will be her main campaign issue ahead of her November re-election bid.

Dixon said the charter is sacred.

“I think the city is absolutely in the best shape it’s ever been,” said the Rome native, who pined for her mountain life after raising children in Sandy Springs.

But whether Mountain Park is its own city or part of Roswell, the two will never be fully separate, Jones said.

“They go to church together, their kids go to school together, play on the same sports teams,” she said.

Jones, who represents both cities, would likely be the legislator to handle the dissolution.

“If the Mountain Park City Council chooses to dissolve the city charter, I have committed to both cities that I’ll work with them toward a smooth and fair integration into Roswell,” she said.

It isn’t easy to do, just ask the city of Rest Haven. The town of about 22 residents in Gwinnett County that has been trying to end itself nearly two decades.

Still said some people who move to Mountain Park from elsewhere have misconceptions about what level of services to expect from a former summer resort town.

“There’s a choice, you either pay more or you do more,” he said.

Stone Mountain Park board announces changes including new museum, logo

DEKALB COUNTY, Ga. — The Stone Mountain Memorial Association has released the first in a series of changes and additions to the Confederate imagery at the park.The association met at 1 p.m. Monday to pass the series of resolutions to “intended to begin the process of balancing Stone Mountain Park’s historic mission as a Confederate Memorial, with today’s broader realities of it being metro Atlanta’s largest green space and Georgia’s most visited tourism destination.”One of the changes i...

DEKALB COUNTY, Ga. — The Stone Mountain Memorial Association has released the first in a series of changes and additions to the Confederate imagery at the park.

The association met at 1 p.m. Monday to pass the series of resolutions to “intended to begin the process of balancing Stone Mountain Park’s historic mission as a Confederate Memorial, with today’s broader realities of it being metro Atlanta’s largest green space and Georgia’s most visited tourism destination.”

One of the changes includes a new museum exhibit inside Memorial Hall, which will tell the “warts and all” history of the Stone Mountain Carving, acknowledging the reformation of the Ku Klux Klan atop the mountain in 1915, as with the 50 years of Klan rallies that followed.

The resolution also calls for a new logo for the park. The Confederate flag plaza on the walkup trail at the base of the mountain will move into something called “Valor Park.”

Channel 2′s Richard Elliot was at the park, where the group said that this is a compromise they know won’t make everyone happy.

Stone Mountain Memorial Association CEO Bill Stephens said COVID-19 and the park’s affiliation with the Confederacy have combined to cut Stone Mountain Park’s revenue from 2019 to 2020 by 56%.

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Stone Mountain Park was the site of several demonstrations last summer. A coalition of citizens and activists have again asked the board in charge for changes.

One Confederate monument supporter Elliot talked to said he was OK with the changes.

“It’s not the destruction of the monument, you know,” Eric Cleveland said. “They moved the flags. As long as they put them in a place of honor, I don’t have a terrible issue with it.”

But some said they don’t go nearly far enough.

A woman who only wanted to be identified as Okanona didn’t mind expressing her opinion on the Confederate imagery at the park.

“I think it’s disgusting that I have to walk past Robert E. Lee and that huge carving there,” Okanona said.

John Evans said it is time to “eliminate the Confederacy and move on.”

The association is creating a seven-person commission to look at even more changes to the park down the road, including possibly removing Confederate general street names.

The board is limited by state laws as what they can and can’t do with the monuments. Members of two local NAACP chapters say their boycotts of the park will continue.

Stone Mountain Park board weighing potential new business partners

Leaders at Stone Mountain Park are inching toward the selection of a new private business partner to manage revenue-generating attractions at the popular — but divisive — tourist destination.The board of directors of the Stone Mountain Memorial Association, the state authority tasked with maintaining the 3,200-acre park, held a brief meeting Monday morning at...

Leaders at Stone Mountain Park are inching toward the selection of a new private business partner to manage revenue-generating attractions at the popular — but divisive — tourist destination.

The board of directors of the Stone Mountain Memorial Association, the state authority tasked with maintaining the 3,200-acre park, held a brief meeting Monday morning at which they took no official action but discussed potential new partners during an hour-long executive session, CEO Bill Stevens said.

Georgia’s open meetings law allows such discussions to take place behind closed doors.

Silver Dollar City/Stone Mountain Park — a subsidiary of Peachtree Corners-based Herschend Family Entertainment — has managed attractions like the skylift, the laser show, shops and convention space at the park since they were first privatized in the 1990s.

But the company notified the memorial association last year that it would be pulling out in the summer of 2022, citing “protests and division” surrounding the park’s Confederate imagery among the reasons.

In July, the memorial association issued a formal call for companies interested in taking on the management role to submit proposals. The deadline for submissions was Sept. 8.

Stephens said that Oct. 1 remains a “reasonable estimation” of the memorial association’s timeline for announcing a finalist, but he has otherwise declined to offer many details.

It’s not clear how many companies submitted bids.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s recent request for copies of the bids was denied. Officials cited a section of Georgia open records law that allows officials to keep such items confidential “until such time as the final award of the contract is made, the project is terminated or abandoned, or the agency in possession of the records takes a public vote” on the matter.

Asked Monday if he was happy with the number and quality of bids submitted, Stephens didn’t answer directly.

“This is hard,” he said. “This is a very complex place to operate, and there are a lot of significant questions that we have to answer. So I’ll just acknowledge it is very hard.”

While groups like the Sons of Confederate Veterans are pushing to prevent changes to the park’s Confederate imagery, others like the NAACP and the Stone Mountain Action Coalition want to see a wide-ranging transformation — including addressing the massive carving of Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee that adorns the mountain’s northern face.

The memorial association is currently positioned somewhere in the middle, considering several more moderate initiatives to try and soften the park’s image (and lessen the related financial ramifications).

Those initiatives include the creation of an on-site museum exhibit that officials have said would seek to “tell the truth” about the carving and its roots in white supremacy, the Jim Crow era and massive resistance to desegregation.

The memorial association is in the process of assembling a committee to lead the exhibit’s creation.

Previously given deadlines for the announcement of that committee — which officials have said will include historians and local community leaders — have come and gone. But Stephens said news could be coming in the next few weeks.

He said “several” people have committed to be part of the committee and he’s still trying to convince “a couple” more to join.

Soon, Stephens said, the memorial association will issue a request for proposals for companies interested in physically designing and creating the exhibit. He hopes the RFP will prove to those on the fence that the memorial association is serious about moving forward, and encourage them to be a part of guiding what’s included in the exhibit.

“I think a lot of exhibit companies will be interested in this one because it will be unique, it will be one of a kind,” Stephens said. “And there’s nowhere else in America you can tell the particular story that we have to tell.”

Stone Mountain Park board approves truth-telling exhibit, moving flags

The Stone Mountain Memorial Association board on Monday approved a handful of resolutions that it hopes will help soften the image of the world’s largest Confederate monument — and, perhaps, get the park out of a looming economic bind.The adopted resolutions included giving the go-ahead for a new on-site museum exhibit that officials say would aim to ...

The Stone Mountain Memorial Association board on Monday approved a handful of resolutions that it hopes will help soften the image of the world’s largest Confederate monument — and, perhaps, get the park out of a looming economic bind.

The adopted resolutions included giving the go-ahead for a new on-site museum exhibit that officials say would aim to “tell the truth” about the ugly history of the park and the mountainside carving of Confederate leaders Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee.

The board also approved relocating a Confederate flag plaza from the mountain’s walk-up trail. The flags, which were erected in the 1960s by the United Daughters of the Confederacy, would be moved to Valor Park — an area near the base of the mountain that already hosts a number of other tributes to the Civil War South.

Georgia law prohibits the flags from being removed entirely, but officials said the move would keep them off the park’s most heavily trafficked area.

The logo for the Stone Mountain Memorial Association itself, which currently including a rendering of the carving, will change as well.

“We’re just taking our first step today, to get where we need to go,” said Rev. Abraham Mosley, who became the memorial association’s first Black board chairman when he was appointed last month.

Memorial association CEO Bill Stephens called the changes the “most dramatic move forward” since the park opened in the ‘60s. That’s likely true, and the fact that they were even on the table marks a significant shift in the memorial association’s approach to the mountain.

But activists who have spent years calling for a reckoning at Stone Mountain hope there’s a lot more to come.

The changes approved Monday do not include renaming streets in the park that bear the names of Confederate leaders or altering or removing the carving itself, which many activists have pushed for.

“We want you to take what you have, clean it up, and let’s move on,” former DeKalb NAACP chairman John Evans said, calling for the carving to be removed and street names changed. “We’re just not gonna accept anything less than that.”

Other initiatives previously pitched by Stephens — including renaming the park’s Confederate Hall building — were not addressed during Monday’s meeting but aren’t being abandoned, Stephens said.

Under the resolution adopted Monday, the chair and vice chair of the memorial association board would appoint seven members to an advisory committee that will help shape the new museum exhibit contextualizing the carving.

Stephens said he envisions a committee of community leaders, local residents and historians. The adopted resolution anticipates it would be active for one year, starting July 1.

“We want to have the makeup of the community involved with those seven that we select,” said Mosley.

The carving was started in the Jim Crow era and, like other Confederate monuments from that time, was intended to glorify white supremacy, historians recently told the AJC. Members of the second Ku Klux Klan, which was reborn on Stone Mountain in 1915, also had a role in the carving’s conception.

Foiled by financial issues and personal spats, the carving was abandoned in late 1920s. Work didn’t resume until after the state of Georgia bought the mountain in 1958.

Historians said the purchase was largely a reaction to federally mandated school integration and the Civil Rights movement.

The mostly completed carving was dedicated in 1970, more than a century after the end of the Civil War.

“We’re gonna tell that story,” Stephens said.

Dennis Collard is a co-founder of the Stone Mountain Action Coalition, a grassroots group that has called for change at the park since its formation last summer.

“It is time to stop pretending that this place is about heritage,” he said.

Financial concerns

Officials admit the changes currently being considered at the park are largely driven by financial concerns.

Marriott purportedly plans to pull out of operating the park’s primary hotel and convention center. And Herschend Family Entertainment, which has operated the park’s revenue-generating attractions since they were privatized in 1998, plans to leave next summer.

Herschend, a Norcross-based company, cited both COVID-19 and frequent clashes between Confederate groups, far right extremists and counter-protesters as reasons for ending their partnership with the park.

Stephens said he has spoken with several companies about taking over Herschend’s role and all said that “the Confederacy issue” needs to be addressed before they would consider doing so.

“I think these were necessary steps to be able to say to people who would do business with us, that we want to tell the truth, tell the whole story,” Stephens said Monday. “We’re limited on what we can do and can’t do, but we’re gonna take action where we can. And I hope it makes a difference.”

WHAT THE STONE MOUNTAIN MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION VOTED ON

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